An ethical perspective of altruism

Let me rephrase to make it more general.

An ethical perspective of altruism

Someone who is a complete egoist does not care at all about other people, but only about their own goals, interests, and their own benefit.

An egoist will not necessarily be greedy and selfish in an obvious sense, for example, they may be An ethical perspective of altruism and friendly, even happy to share and help others. However, their motive will always be their own gain, for example, they will help others in order to be helped in return at a later date, and they will obey laws because this helps to bring about peace and security in society, something which they will benefit from.

Their motivation for seemingly thoughtful and caring actions will not be actual concern for others, but intelligent self-concern and prudence.

There are two different kinds of egoism, so it is necessary to describe their differences: Psychological Egoism is not a moral theory, but aims to be a psychological theory about human motivation.

The Fallacies of Egoism and Altruism, and the Fundamental Principle of Morality

Psychological Egoism holds that all of us are completely selfish and are hardwired to only think of our own needs. It is literally impossible for us to genuinely care about other people. Whenever we perform an action it is always with our own good in mind. When you help a friend it is so they will help you back.

If a man gives money to a cancer charity this is not because he really cares about those who are suffering from cancer, but so that he can feel good about himself, or so that there will be good health care available for him to use if he is unlucky enough to get cancer.

Ethical Egoism, on the other hand, states that it is possible for people to genuinely care about other people to be altruisticbut that they should not bother caring about others.

Instead people ought to be selfish and think only about their own needs. This article will focus purely on Ethical Egoism. Altruistic actions are selfless, they are done for the sake of other people and not for any personal gain, perhaps even sacrificing your own needs and desires for the sake of others.

Many people argue that actions can only be moral if they are done for the sake of helping others rather than yourself. It is often thought that we have a natural inclination to be selfish, so that learning to think of others is an admirable thing to do.

Mother Teresa is often seen as an example of altruism, she was a Catholic nun who dedicated her life to helping the poor in India. A Psychological Egoist would say that she really did this for her own benefit, to feel good about herself or get in to heaven. There is a common assumption that you are either selfish in your actions, or selfless.

This is perhaps too simplistic, for most of us probably have a complicated mixture of selfish desires and selfless desires. Many philosophers argue that egoism and altruism do not totally exclude each other, you do not have to lose all care for yourself in order to care properly about other people.

Ethical Egoism Ethical Egoism does not deny the possibility of altruism: Ethical Egoists would admit that it is perfectly possible to care about other people. However, according to the Ethical Egoist you ought not to care about the needs or welfare of others, you should only care about and act on your own needs and interests.

Altruism and Group Selection | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This means that Ethical Egoism is a Normative Ethical theory stating how people should act, and stating that you should act selfishly. The theory turns conventional morality on its head by saying it is good to be selfish: Of course it makes sense to help other people and not to be outwardly greedy, to share for example, but only because this is the best way of achieving what you want for yourself in the long term.

Ethical Egoism is a teleological theory according to which the correct action a person should take is the action that has the best consequence for that person themselves, regardless of the effects on other people. As Michael Palmer puts it: An Ethical Egoist only cares about his own needs and desires, and would view himself as having value, whilst others are not of value to him.

This is what the Ethical Egoist does to all actions which are altruistic, he condemns them as foolish:Ethical relativism is the thesis that ethical principles or judgments are relative to the individual or culture.

When stated so vaguely relativism is embraced by numerous lay persons and a sizeable contingent of philosophers. The notion of altruism.

The concept has a long history in philosophical and ethical thought. The term was originally coined in the 19th century by the founding sociologist and philosopher of science, Auguste Comte, and has become a major topic for psychologists (especially evolutionary psychology researchers), evolutionary biologists, and ethologists.

Recent ethical scandals in business (Colvin, , Mehta, , Revell, ) have raised important questions about the role of leadership in shaping ethical timberdesignmag.com employees look outside themselves to significant others for ethical guidance (Kohlberg, , Treviño, ).Therefore, in the workplace, leaders should be a central source of such guidance.

Fortunately, more and more people are understanding this idea, and the result is a growing movement: effective altruism.

An ethical perspective of altruism

Ethics. The field of ethics (or moral philosophy) involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong behavior. Philosophers today usually divide ethical theories into three general subject areas: metaethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics.

Ethical Egoism & Altruism DP Barrett - Ethical Egoism & Altruism The word ‘egoism’ derives from the Latin ‘ego’ which means ‘I.’ Egoism is the idea of being selfish and always putting your own needs first without regard for the needs of others.

Morals vs. Ethics | timberdesignmag.com | Ethics Defined